Read Being Religious, American Style: A History of Popular Religiosity in the United States by Charles H. Lippy Online

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Popular religion rarely expresses itself in the artifacts of high culture. In this book, Lippy approaches the study of popular religion by asking how ordinary people have gone about the process of being religious in America. Along the way, he examines popular religious periodicals, newspapers, novels, diaries, devotional materials, hymnals, promotional materials for revivaPopular religion rarely expresses itself in the artifacts of high culture. In this book, Lippy approaches the study of popular religion by asking how ordinary people have gone about the process of being religious in America. Along the way, he examines popular religious periodicals, newspapers, novels, diaries, devotional materials, hymnals, promotional materials for revivals and camp meetings, religious tracts, as well as vernacular art and architecture, other artifacts, and, especially in the 20th century, radio, film, and television. He avoids the traditional focus on religious movements and institutions, choosing instead to illuminate the cultural impact of what people in America think and do when they are being religious by highlighting aspects of private life....

Title : Being Religious, American Style: A History of Popular Religiosity in the United States
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ISBN : 9780275949013
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 296 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Being Religious, American Style: A History of Popular Religiosity in the United States Reviews

  • Bob
    2019-01-10 18:51

    Popular religiosity is a phenomenon of every culture. Popular religiosity is the personal, informal expressions of religious belief that flourish outside the structures of formal belief. And these have played an important role in American religious history, according to Charles Lippy.From the Puritans in New England to African American slaves in the south to contemporary charismatic movements and "New Spirituality" expressions, individuals have sought an immediate, personal encounter with the supernatural, apart from religious structures. For Lippy, this accounts both for the vitality and the privatization of belief among Americans.I would agree and suggest that for churches and other religious bodies to thrive, they need to foster this connection with the supernatural. Sadly, the trend in many theological circles is toward the de-supernaturalization of the church, a bifurcation between sacred and secular. What seems necessary is for churches to recover the sense of the presence of the Living God. What churches also offer are formative communities that can channel and discipline personal expressions of spirituality, and through the lived experience of their own communal life in the world, can equip their members for a more constructive engagement of the wider public world. The predominance of personal, idiosyncratic expression coupled with weak communal life and a weak theology of the Sovereignty of God in all of life leaves people ill-equipped for public engagement. Their only resources are experience and moralism--thin fare for engaging the public world.